An explanation of the “missing middle” of housing

An explanation of the “missing middle” of housing

Missing Middle Housing is a concept used to describe a range of multi-family or clustered housing types that are compatible in scale with single-family neighborhoods. Missing middle housing is intended to meet housing demand in walkable neighborhoods by responding to changing demographics and providing housing options at different price points.

The term “missing middle” is meant to describe housing types that were common in the pre-WWII United States such as duplexes, rowhomes, and courtyard apartments but are now less common and, therefore, “missing”. Rather than focusing on the number of units in a structure, missing middle emphasizes scale and heights.

The term “missing middle” is meant to describe housing types that were common in the pre-WWII United States such as duplexes, rowhomes, and courtyard apartments but are now less common and, therefore, “missing.”

Missing middle housing tends to become naturally affordable rental housing as it ages, and provides a level of density to support the shops, restaurants, and transit that are associated with walkable neighborhoods. Housing units are usually smaller units than single family homes because they share a lot with other homes, which results in lower per-unit land costs.

Missing Middle Housing offers greater choice in housing types, while still blending into existing single family neighborhoods. They are typically more affordable than a single-family home because they are smaller and share communal parking and lawns.